September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

ACS offers Man to Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The American Cancer Society offers guidance on prostate cancer screening and treatment, along with support for men dealing with the disease.  As the leader in the fight to end cancer and create a world with more birthdays, the American Cancer Society is fighting prostate cancer in every community through patient services, research and advocacy, helping men live longer, healthier, happier lives.

Aside from skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the U.S., with an estimated 241,740 new cases – affecting every one out of six men – this year.  Although prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men, surpassed only by lung cancer, there are more than two million men in the U.S. today who count themselves as prostate cancer survivors.

Finding and treating prostate cancer early increases the chances for survival, yet prostate cancer usually has no symptoms.  The American Cancer Society urges men to stay well by talking with their doctors to make an informed decision about screening for prostate cancer.  All men should be given sufficient information about the benefits and limitations of testing and early detection to allow them to make a decision based on their personal values and preferences.

Men at average risk should receive this information beginning at age 50. Men at higher risk, including African American men and men with a first degree relative (father or brother) diagnosed with prostate cancer before age 65, should receive this information beginning at age 45. Men at appreciably higher risk (multiple family members diagnosed with prostate cancer before age 65) should receive this information beginning at age 40.

The American Cancer Society helps men get well after a prostate cancer diagnosis by offering free patient services and programs, such as Man to Man, a prostate cancer support group to help men cope with prostate cancer through community-based education and support. Volunteers organize these monthly meetings where guest speakers lead discussions and inform participants about prostate cancer, treatment, side effects, and how to cope with prostate cancer. Man to Man meetings, open to all men along with their caregivers and family members, are held in the Champlain Valley every second Tuesday of the month at American Cancer Society Hope Lodge Lois McClure – Bee Tabakin Building in Burlington, 6-8 pm.

“The American Cancer Society is dedicated to helping cancer patients get well and stay well,” said Kelly Stoddard, vice president for Health and Advocacy Initiatives with the American Cancer Society.  “We’re here with free services and information when cancer patients and their families need us most, helping to ease the burden of their cancer journey.”

The American Cancer Society is finding cures by funding $51 million on 91 research grants into how to better prevent, detect, and treat prostate cancer. Promising new research on genetics is helping scientists better understand how prostate cancer grows and how to identify the abnormal genes which put some men at high risk.

ACS CAN, the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society, supports evidence-based policy and legislative solutions designed to eliminate cancer as a major health problem.

To learn more about prostate cancer, visit www.cancer.org or call 1.800.227.2345, all day, every day.  To register for the American Cancer Society Man to Man support group meeting in the Champlain Valley on Oct. 9 at 6 pm, contact Mary L. Guyette RN, MS, 802-274-4990 or vmary@aol.com, or Sophia Morton, with your local American Cancer Society, at Sophia.morton@cancer.org or call toll free 1-866-466-0626.

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